Monday Morning Music with Colin Meloy

It isn’t very often that my love for children’s books overlaps with my interest in music.  It does happen, of course.  Lemony Snicket/Daniel Handler of The Magnetic Fields is the most prominent example.  I blogged about his latest book recently in a post with an embarrassing break-up confession, if you’re into those kind of posts.  There is also John Crossingham from Broken Social Scene, who wrote the fabulous nonfiction book Learn to Speak Music.  I blogged about that one here, with help from a few Minneapolis musicians who offer their advice for young musicians. Now, it seems, it’s happened again. Colin Meloy, of The Decemberists, has written a children’s fantasy novel that delves into an imaginary world just outside of Portland, Oregon.

Wildwood is not my usual reading material.  I rarely read fantasy–I recently admitted to a childhood dislike of Dr. Seuss–but ever so occasionally, I will enjoy a quasi-realistic fantasy story.  You know, the one that starts in a familiar place (like Portland, for example) but have some mysterious element (like an Impassable Wilderness) and a kid who finds him or herself along the way.  That’s Wildwood in a nutshell.  I liked it. :)

But this post isn’t supposed to be about the book.  It’s supposed to be about the music.  Yes, the book has a soundtrack.  Actually, a lot of children’s books have soundtracks these days, so of course, a book by a musician would have one.  What interested me about this particular soundtrack was that it starts and ends with Led Zeppelin.  Do kids know Led Zeppelin?  My guess is no.

In the spirit of last week’s parenting guest post about introducing kids to the world beyond children’s music, I love this.  What better way to get kids to appreciate classic rock than to associate it with a book they loved?  Here you go:

 

Curious about Wildwood?  Here’s a video that showcases the lovely art by Carson Ellis:

 

And, for good measure, here is The Decemberists for your viewing pleasure:

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